Borrowed fire at sea: Mark Twain and Arthur Ransome

Missee Lee (1941) is an adventure novel in Arthur Ransome’s Swallows and Amazons series, one of the two novels in the series whose extraordinary places and events really could not have happened. I don’t know how the Arthur Ransome Society would feel about this theory, but I’ve always held that Missee Lee, like Peter Duck (1932), … Continue reading Borrowed fire at sea: Mark Twain and Arthur Ransome

Advertisements

Sax Rohmer’s The Mystery of Fu-Manchu

  Sax Rohmer (listen to the podcast of the earlier version of this review here) was obsessed with what he and the lower reaches of the pre-First World War popular British press used to call ‘the Yellow Peril’ (I hope you notice the inverted commas around that phrase).  After the war, things began to get … Continue reading Sax Rohmer’s The Mystery of Fu-Manchu

Now posting on Vulpes Libris: North Korean magical realism

I've posted a review of Hwang Sok-yong's novel Princess Bari over on Vulpes Libris: magical realism, forest survival, spirit voices, starvation, reflexology, snakehead extortion, refugee survival, the long arm of the law circumvented by smiling faces and deft disappearances, the floating, shifting population of London's migrant communities and the silent snowy Chinese hillsides where Bari is taught … Continue reading Now posting on Vulpes Libris: North Korean magical realism